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in education today. thank you for sitting with us. >> happy to be here. >> there was a summit last year. at the end of the summit they published a paper that had four -- 5 points. at the end, it came around teaching and it had to do with teacher evaluations. >> this is hard. we were talking about this this morning. the conversation is going on around the world, which is exciting, particularly for the united states. before i get your answer, we have to praise this administration for getting involved on in the -- involved in the international conversation. we have never done that before. we are part of that conversation, which i think is very positive for us. so, a teacher evaluation. every teacher knows they make a difference in how a child learns. they would not come to work if they did not believe that. the challenge is, how do you assess what they are achieving with kids? what everybody objects to within the profession is you cannot tell if you're doing a good job based on the score on a single test. what a child does on a single test, on a single day does not do justice to the child'
, 2012 meeting of the joint meeting of the san francisco board of education and the san francisco board of supervisors. the city and school district select committee. my name is david campos and i am the chair of the committee. madam secretary, if you can please take the roll? before we do that i wanted to thank the following members of sfgtv staff who are covering the meeting today. mark bunch and bill dylan. madam secretary. >> did you want me to read the first item? >> roll call. >> roll call. we haven't had one. supervisor campos? >> present. >> supervisor olague? >> here. >> thank you. supervisor chu? >> he's in route. >> [speaker not understood]? >> here. >> [speaker not understood]? >> and commissioner mendosa. >> here. >> thank you very much. madam secretary, if you can please call item number 1. >> thank you, supervisor. it's item 120 3 93, hearing on the student drop out rates as introduced by supervisor cohen. >> this is an item that has been introduced by supervisor cohen. before i turn it over to supervisor cohen, i want to thank her for being here. i just wanted to sort of
-speech and is with fire the foundation for individual rights and education. hadley, you were not very political. what happened? >> i have opinions but struggled what i believe, when to speak up, and when to be quiet. john: the because of friends ? >> there were a variety of students that were very mature but others who could be loudmouth that overshadows the culture with a small group to make a lot of noise it can be intimidating. congressmen tom 10 credo was invited but the speech never happened. john: he has positions on immigration that you disagree. i am not in alignment with his philosophy and every issue. tax policy but not by to buy another issues. i was not present the day they shutdown the event but many were shouting there is no debate. no-space 48. that hit home. >> he was shouted down. john: somewhere outside the building and throwing rocks through the window? >> university reacted and condemned the action. unc denounce. but some people did not want to have the debate. some think my views are so illegitimate i should not say them. john: you go to campuses around the country. most illibera
, but also focusing on the students that were not given adequate education that they deserved yesterday, then i can talk about that. >> so, you probably know what the numbers were looking like 10 years ago as i was. thank you, mr. chair. that's all i have. >> colleagues, i'd like to turn it over to public comment. i think it's really important for us to hear from members of the public. so, i have a number of speaker cards that i'm going to read. but any member of the public who would like to speak on items 1 and 2, i would ask that you come forward. so, the speaker cards are from sharon hewett, robert woods, lilly ratcliff, jamil patterson, peter alexander, and ace washington. please come up. you each have two minutes. and we also have shaman walton. >>> hi, i'm [speaker not understood], and i did not fill out a card. i do apologize. one thing we're talking about solutions. first i wanted you to picture this. my kids' friends, when i encourage them to go back to school after they graduate, say, hey, i'm not going to live beyond 21. what for? there's hopelessness. solution, maybe we need
is the first time i met you. i'm a product of a public school. every bit of my education has been k through 12 has been through public school. so, i'm trying to figure out at what point -- what point do we start to lose this battle? that's why i asked for the longitudinal study the last ten years. it would be great if we could go even further back than that. i'm going to -- mr. arm entrout, i want to ask you to follow-up to get the answers to the questions that i propose here today. this last question really is -- i'm just looking for a better understanding, i've got? some concrete solutionses that the unified school district is going to be implementing to help combat these high drop-out rates. * i've heard some solutions today about the partnerships that you've passed, that -- partnerships with the city and the cbos and i've heard about a through g requirementses. i agree like many other members, a through g should be the standard no matter what. i do remember when i came through, i graduated -- there were some students who did finish with a through g and some didn't but still were
election for new supervisors, new education boards. i don't feel like nothing is getting done. so, it's a cry out for us and the community to get together and do some family literacy, do some family violence prevention, educational system don't have a curriculum for taking african americans no history. it's all about slavery, about columbus discovered america. he ain't discover no america. abraham lincoln didn't free the slaves because it was a good thing to do. it was decided on union. so, we need to get down to the history books. and when they teach our children the history of how we became great people, how we made these great inventions and things, the school don't teach us. and we wonder why young folks are out there hanging on the streets and saying people keep saying it's a family generation now of schools that is just ridiculous now. everywhere in my community there is a charter school. i don't even know if it's a public school in my community any more. and the charter schools, our kids can't go to the charter schools. we've got a charter school sitting right there on old gold
, educators and community based organizations play a key role in identifying and creating implementing strategies to deal with safety concerns and causes of crime. students, educators and cbos know their schools and communities better than anyone else. they spend their time in them and have created relationships that give them access to information to know how to deal with safety concerns. we all know enforcement alone will never address crime at its roots. we must consider the community-based organizations to support our youth. they are as important as maintaining safe schools and communities just as sfpd. so, as you continue to hear the rest of our youth today, we look to you to address the concerns and understanding that youth input and participation is vital to providing input and feedback to ongoing police and teacher training, providing sufficient resources to our schools, measuring and defining safe schools, on a personal note i attended balboa high school many years ago. and, you know, looking at the bars and the gates, i feel like the school is a prison. by bringing police off
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. faugh >>vicki: food banks are having a test time to keep their shells filled. jeff pierce shows us how the local community is pitching in. jeff >> hundreds of volunteers showed up at the food banks on saturday to help the pressing needs that local food banks are experiencing. >> people of us that potatoes and to do the day-to-day tasks. the bigger piece is trying to educate the committee about hunger, why there is a need and what they can do to make a difference. >> as the need has accelerated, food banks are having to rely more on individual help from the communities as the sources they have traditionally depended upon have diminished. >> many people come to us who need food assistance. the way the government is, the
education. and even in [speaker not understood], because by the way, you have to be academically ready to ascend and not just be at the labor reer level. -- laborer level. so, i'm happy, supervisor cohen, and president chiu, you understand where we are at and we are not turning a blind aye to this issue -- [multiple voices] >> thank you, commissioner. commissioner fewer. >> yes, i'd like to comment a little bit about looking at the state. quite frankly, when i saw this data, i myself was very, very shocked particularly about the students not on track for graduation. supervisor, i share your concern. i think as far as the pathway, this is a pathway to nowhere. so, i just want to emphasize about the difference between feel better and do better. i know if you're not really in this conversation all the time, what does it really mean when we give two sets of data that say, on track c or better and on track d or better. on that track d or better is a lie, it is a lie to all our students because we instituted an a through g graduation requirement to do two things, one is to give access so tha
, everybody pays for education, and every year they get worse education and it costs more. we've dumbed down our school program to rush kids through the system. why not do it the other way? why not had let the achieving kids rush through the system and get away from this burgeoning ed accuracy? beyond that, we're spending money on things that aren't being productive for our economy. let these achieving students, send them the message that if you achieve you will be rewarded. the idea we're going to get any of this taxpayer money back is kind of a mirage. taxpayers never get any money back. it will move on to the next boondoggle. i think it's a good idea. >> half of property taxes go to schools to be fair. tracy, the kids issue, you can get them out of your house two years earlier. what do you make about that? >> you know what, the money issue to me is separate from the academic development issue. i don't think these kids should be rushed through school. i do think there's a reason they need these years to develop as people. when you do look at the dollars and cents, there are a lot of people
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >> schieffer: and we're back now with our panel, larry sabato. i want to come back to you. how important do you think this debate is going to be, this first one? >> it's critical to mitt romney. he really does have to show his stuff there, and he has to-- he has to change his emage. he has the image of a kru club republican. he has to go after president obama in a coherent way with a real message. but, you know, history tells me, bob, that generally speaking, the challenger does gain from the first debate. it will be a surprise if he doesn't gain. and he very much needs to. he needs to get some momentum. based on history, i would say the odds favor mitt romney in the first debate. >> schieffer: let me ask you about your home state, virginia. your center is headquartered at u.v.a. what's happening there? is this going to come down to virginia? a lot of people think it might. >> well, it could. obviously, it would have to be very close to
.atwill change if with the programs i've talked about aif you help with job retraining and education. i am a firm liever that our america 2,000 education problem is the answer. it will take a while educate, but it is a good program. her best hope for short term is job retraining if she was thrown out of work at a defence plant. tell her it's not all that gloomy. we're the uentd states. we faced tough problems before. look when the democrats had both the white house and the congress, it was throug. can do better. the way to do better is not to tax and spend, but to retrain and get the control of the mandatory programs. i am much more apt mystic about this country than some. >> mr. perot -- mr. perot, you have one minute, sir. >> well, the defense is going to have to convert to industries. the sooner they start the sooner they'll finish. there will be a significant. it is important not to let the industrial base deteriorate. we had someone who i regret said it, in the president staff said he doesn't care if we made potato chips or computer chips, anybody that cares about it, care as great deal. you
something about education and college students and help of that kind. half -- one out of two of the full-time college students in the united states are receiving some form of federal aid. but there, again, we found people that there under the previous administration, families that had no limit to income were still eligible for low-interest college loans. we didn't think that was right. and so, we have set a standard that those loans and those grants are directed to the people who otherwise could not go to college, their family incomes were so low. so, there are a host of other figures that reveal that the grant programs are greater than they have ever been, taking care of more people than they ever have. 7.7 million elderly citizens who were living in the lowest 20% of earnings -- 7.7 million have moved up into another bracket since our administration took over, leaving only 5 million of the elderly in that bracket when there had been more than 13 million. >> mr. president, in a visit to texas -- in brownsville, i believe it was, in the rio grande valley -- you did observe that the econo
say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >>> welcome back to eyewitness news cbs 5 the last saturday in september 2012 when go out on hotter now than yesterday. some readings across the bay for degrees warmer in san francisco let's 6215 degrees hotter in livermore at 93. san jose mid-seventies common. the thought compressed to 700 ft., that keeps san francisco cool this evening at 58, otherwise we drop down in the mid '80s in the tri valley oakland now 61 degrees. that high pressure strengthens it rents up and produces an off shore flow which means dry winds from inland areas moving offshore in an easterly direction that increases potential for fire danger, what dissipates the offshore wind we dissipates the offshore wind we makes it easy for anne to manage her finances when she's on the go. even when sh
education system to free up the knowledge to make it look attractive for minorities to have the desire to want to learn the way out to be just as successful as those that they look up to? >> writing the book one of the things that has stuck with me is yon black and brown men, young boys are not accepting. culturally part of it is societal but the dinosaur had the ice age. we have education and technology. they did not make the adjustment it is not here. if the black brown mail this not make the adjustment they will not be here. we have to make it safe for our children to be smart, respectful, individua ls because what i was a boy i wanted to be excepted so bad i or myself to me i try. i will never let that happen again. to say if i cannot change the people around me you have to be afraid to stand by yourself that is the clearest it will ever be. there is a tendency to be accepted so bad people have all kinds of estimations but a man would do anything to take care of the family. not that i would not do that. and a woman sought a man who do anything you could do it every wanted the you w
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important iss
send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. in the people, businesses, and organizations that call the bay area home. whether it's helping a nonprofit provide safe, affordable housing within the city, supporting an organization that's helping kids find jobs and stay in school, or financing the expansion of a local company that's creating healthier workplaces, what's important to the people of the bay area is important to us. and we're proud to work with all those >>> people of lost a loved one to accident or illness say changes their lives forever tonight the personal story of a bay area psychiatrist who face the death of his teenage son dr. kim mulvihill of that loss convinced him his profession has got one thing all wrong. >>> graveyards full of grief and loss, but here on mt. tam applies in marin county
and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already
county as a place that needs help with education. you see like much of the country there is an achievement gap. if one be area organizations working hard to close the gap and its president and executive director and board member join us this morning thinking so much for joining us. tulsa about the project is a new school. >>> it is larger than the for the school. the project is about six years old. working people between the ages of 8 and 22. and we started >>> tells about the school. what is its mission? >>> the mission of the school is to try to ensure that kids fall in love with reading and at the connect with old control thinking and self esteem. >>> how is it different from other schools? >>> is different from other schools because it's so large focus on honoring your culture. honoring who you are. its focus is for you to feel good in a sense of pride about yourself, your family, your community and your abilities. and i love it because it's a large percentage of black children and the demographics of shown in marin city and many hispanic children. but the idea
this story with the world. you wouldn't know it to look over here, but public education is our most pressing political, social and moral problem. everybody knows it, and positions are entrenched, and there's a lot of hot rhetoric on all sides. somehow we've gotten to a point where frustration has built to such a fever pitch, that we've turned on teachers as the villains and started shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer after a good story to tell, i went looking in the pressure cooker of a public high school working against the clock to raise test scores. i wanted to take a look at what we're throwing away in this big national purge. instead, i found a dynamic principle leading a -- principal, leading a group of passionate, dedicated teachers at a school with a proud tradition to rally the community around. i found a scramble to help a surprisingly savvy group of kids who have been largely abandoned by the system. um, as most of you probably know, the book traces the pivotal 2009-2010 school year at reagan high, and we've been -- weaved in a lot of its history. not all, but
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
a break -- but he vetoed it anyway. i offer a new direction. invest in american jobs, american education, control health care costs, bring this country together again. i want the future of this country to be as bright and brilliant as its past, and it can be if we have the courage to change. [applause] >> president bush, your opposing statement. >> let me tell you a little what it's like to be president. in the oval office, you can't predict what kind of crisis is going to come up. you have to make tough calls. you can't be on one hand this way and one hand another. you can't take different positions on these difficult issues. and then you need a philosophical -- i'd call it a philosophical underpinning. mine for foreign affairs is democracy and freedom, and look at the dramatic changes around the world. the cold war is over. the soviet union is no more and we're working with a democratic country. poland, hungary, czechoslovakia, the baltics are free. take a look at the middle east. we had to stand up against a tyrant. the us came together as we haven't in many, many years. and we kicked
-span and educate themselves to receive more votes. host: thank you for the call. one of your saying -- as we said earlier, ross perot sitting down for his first extended interview in many years. an interview conducted in plano, texas on thursday by richard wealth. they were agreeing to have our cameras in the room. it is a 70 minute conversation including david walker, who has been working with him on a number of initiatives to educate voters on issues in the election. the debt and deficit exceed $16 trillion. his article will appear tomorrow in usa today. we will show you an excerpt in just a moment. first some context to ross perot. when he ran as a third-party, he talked about the growing debt. \ [video clip] >> the world of a unlamented opportunity. what what they say to us if they knew by the year 2000 we will have left them with a national debt of $8 trillion? what would they say if they knew we make them the first generation of americans with a standard of living below the generation below them? we cannot do this to our children. in this election we have the opportunity to choose a candida
for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or eliminated to help balance the city's bu
to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. >>> crews in san jose are working to reopen a road that was closed down early this morning when a driver hit a pole knocking down several power lines. the accident happened around 1:30 a.m. near the interception of almendinger expressway. it appears the 18-year-old driver fell asleep at the wheel. she suffered nonlife threatening injuries. thousands of people lost power overnight but power has since been restored. >>> an arson investigation is under way after fire destroyed a south bay warehouse. ktvu's matt keller is live in san jose where the flames make some near by apartment residents pretty nervous, matt. >> reporter: ken, we watched some work crews put up this chain link fence around the warehouse. the only thing still standing is some of the fence of the front section as the flames de
-bedroom houses. that is a normal neighborhood and talk about how they are concerned about education and health care and they go down the list. my dad used to have an expression. whenever we would come up to him and say, joe, i tell you what i value. he will look to my father and say, do not tell me what you value. show me your budget and i will tell you what you value. show me what your -- show me your budget, i will tell you what about you. [applause] let's take a look at how much they value the middle-class. they have already passed one in the house of representatives, the one embraced by governor romney. look at what it has done. i care about the middle class but i will cut 90 million people -- 19 million people off of medicare. a lot of people say, that is all poor folks. a million of those people are seniors. in fact majority had to sell -- the vast majority of folks had to sell everything they have and whatever savings they had to get into a nursing home. the only reason they are able to get into a nursing home is because of something called the dueled eligible. the get both medicare and
, two the other they think he wants to do, he wanted to invest in education and training programs. that's all well and good, brenda and we know that's going to cost millions and millions of dollars, but that's not how the economy works. >> gary b, it's spending more, what does that do to the debt? >> well, brenda, he tries to get up, up, up. when i went to work for ibm 30-odd years ago, the government didn't teach me how computers work. bem caught me. rockefeller's oil company taught people how to drill for oil and gas and the third thing that strikes me that's not going to work. he wants to double manufacturing jobs, increase manufacturing jobs, that's fine, but why does the manufacturing get the benefit of government largest, why not the financial sector, oil and gas, all of this stuff drives the debt sky high and we know that the government can't spend money efficiently, it's just wrong. >> and jonas, there are also some tax hikes here, and wouldn't that do something to decrease the deficit? >> yes, it's the only specific tax increase that-- of both candidates and if you would close
passod tuesday. throughout those efforts we are also developing our kuft education and noteification program. we never intended to have goch you customers who were surprised to find us as the power provider under this program. we heard from the board and the mayor loud and clear that is a very key issue for you as policy makers as our policy guides, so we are incorporating more elements into that program and will be coming back to you and to the commission with that program proposal in draft form and get feedback to get that target. on the commission meeting of october ninth of next week -- the week after next, excuse me. we will present ou commission with an opportunity to award the contract for developing that program. we conducted a competitive bidding process to select a bidder, to select a counter party to develop that marketing and outreach program for us, and the commission will be asked to authorize us to sign a contract and begin that work. the rate fairness board meeting of october 12 is just one of the near term notice ones. we will have three or four more before we
information and education anand they canake informed decisions anand be better at their jobs. >> one othe things he stressed that the conference i attenended was constantly adapting to the markets. the trick k for that, whether y you are a business owner are trying toto remain viable in the workace, is no getting to the party when it is halfway over. how do you look at where the market is and change and adapt without being almost too late for what is going to go next? >> as a small busess, this is one of t the great benefits. we are able to pick it quickly. when we see trends coming in the market, en we see what ourur stomer requirements are. we are paying attention to what other market leaders are doing. we are able to shiftnterernally and say we need to go in this directio it is just a matter of really staying on top of theame and knowining where things are going and say we will chahange at a momement's notice to meet the needs of our clients. >> what is a way that you evolves, from what you started out to what you're doing now based the marketplace shifts? >> one examples what we are d
huge problems. joining me now with more, consumer education director for credit dot com. thank you for joining us. how widespread is it? how often does it happen that your credit score as the consumer is different than a score your lender is looking at? >> well, almost 100 percent of the time because typically consumers do not get this course that lenders are using, unless they have already applied for credit and been turned down or charge more for credit, then a disclosure is required, but what most of us are doing is going online, getting an education credit score which can be helpful but is not necessarily the same score the lender is using. lori: so why should i spend a right to purchase by credit score if it is now with the lenders getting anywhere? >> it's a great question. of course we give a free credit score. we know what you spend that money. i think what consumers need to look at is, what is the information telling me about my credit worthiness. what can i improve and what can to improve? you can avenges court. lori: and as to what your saying, but i just want to give mo
or blackmail our allies and friends. i want to make sure the education system fulfills its hope and promise. i've had a strong record of working with democrats and republicans in texas to make sure no child is left behind. i understand the limited role of the federal government, but it could be a constructive role when it comes to reform, by insisting that there be a strong accountability systems. my intentions are to earn your vote and earn your confidence. i'm asking for your vote. i want you to be on my team. and for those of you working, thanks from the bottom of my heart. for those of you making up your mind, i would be honored to have your support. >> vice president gore, two minutes. >> i want to thank everybody who watched and listened tonight because this is indeed a crucial time in american history. we're at a fork in the road. we have this incredible prosperity, but a lot of people have been left behind. and we have a very important decision to make. will we use the prosperity to enrich all of our families and not just a few? indeed a crucial time in american history. we're at a for
they are not maryland citizen. the group educating maryland kids coalition says 1% of student population is made up of dreamers. >> in order for these students to be eligible for in-state tuition through the maryland dream act their family must have filed income taxes for three years before going to a maryland college. and file taxes every year they are in college. >> reporter: dream act was well received in this neighborhood. the push will continue until election day on november 6th. cheryl conner abc2 news. >>> so called popular kids thought they pulled off a prank. it backfired. now they are embarrassed on tv ne. find out what happened here. >> it is cool overhead now. spotty showers moving across the state. it is a warm up in the seven- day forecast. that's coming up. >>> 16-year-old high school student was honored for the high school court as a prank. now the joke is on the bully. >> reporter: it was the whirl wind weekend that wasn't supposed to be. hummer limo at the homecoming dance. standing ovation on the football field. sophomore whitney on the homecoming court in her michigan high schoo
in education, the goal was not just to build a dam, not just to build a school, but to improve the capacity, to build the capacity, of the potential government. when you talk to most pakistanis, you say, you give it to who? but it is worth it. we work with the government of pakistan. i would argue it is a failure. not a total failure. i think they got some results and continued to. it was a failure in the vision that we would build the kind of partnership with pakistan, with a capable pakistan that we wanted. those of you who read the book, and those of you who have not should not be in this room, will understand and buy that premise, as i do, that with a very weak state and a strong society, the problem with putting all of that commitment into that week state is flawed. if there are not so many beggars in pakistan, but because of social, tribal, and local structures, it is worth paying attention to the fact that that is the way pakistan is governed and investing in the prospects for a strong state with a state in that situation is fraught with risk. that risk happened. that is one flaw in
anger at politicians. upset with the bank about salary increases and cuts to health and education sectors. spain has as yet to ask for help from the european central bank of their unemployment has doubled the european union average. greta pummeling the island now headed toward the japanese mainland with maximum sustained winds of over 1 mi. per hour making it comparable to a category 3 hurricane. if a crisis today and blew out windows and 50 people injured and now more than two minutes 70,000 households are without electricity. >>> we do have warmer weather for the bay area today first let's have a quick look out that the numbers as the stand right now mostly in the '50s for the bay area warming near 100 in land and on the shoreline and will remain mild. that's going to change in a near record highs and that's and the headline this morning near when it degrees and then stay with peaky and on monday looking to be very warm today and out the door mostly sunshine still fog and low cloud cover and on the shoreline sunset district is not terribly sunny at sunrise this morning because
with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain difference or a picture of a scan or whatever it is, you
the michigan education association used their political clout to kill the bill. if costs were going to be cut by one of those cuts to go elsewhere. they wanted taxes to go up. that is what it's been happening in wisconsin. in wisconsin school districts districts and municipality simply didn't have the power to roll back some of those union benefits so they only solution to keep a service is going was higher taxes. unions were fine with that it wasn't until scott walker reforms which they protested vehemently and the school districts and municipality's gave the ability to get control of their budgets to bring cost and that is when we saw property taxes fall. government exists to serve the people. protecting the public in giving children get education not be good for cutting into it to families take him pay. the common good has to take tired or over the interest of any narrow group. government unions make this impossible. think about what collective pardoning powers do. means the governments, the people rather their elected representatives have to sit down with government unions and bargain wit
and education. by the way, it's rich. george you covered this race very carefully. governor romney during the primary, when his opponents complained, he stopped whining. he questioned the president on, making us a less christian nation. give me a break. you know, presidential campaigns are tough, but we're saying the truth about what governor romney wants to do. but, we're very confident with the case. we're going to make proactively about the president. >> the governor has shown that he can be tough in these debates as you pointed out. we're seeing reports that he's preparing some zingers. >> i think the president views this as part of the entire campaign. you know, our convention, the events that we do in battleground states. ads we're running. now, the debates. a chance to have a conversation with the american people. now, governor romney clearly, that i have been practicing these zingers and lines for months. but that's ultimately not what the american people are looking for, some may judge those to be some ranked well, but the american people are going to be listening not for a cleve
.t.e.-type speeds, i don't have any problem. if you're in the educational context and talking about mobile smart phone and a lot of this access of broadband, in minority communities in particular, i don't view that as an acceptable -- accept table replacement. >> david cohen on telecommunications monday at 8:00 eastern on c-span 2. >> first lady michelle obama was in wisconsin friday at this campaign stop in appleton. this was her second visit to wisconsin in a little more than a month. it's half an hour. [cheers] >> thank you so much! yes, i'm very excited to be with you all today. i want to start by thanking eli for that very kind introduction for everything he's doing for this campaign. i want to thank a couple of -- one more person as well. i want to recognize former senator russ feingold. [cheers] thank you for everything you've done for this state and everything that he's doing for the campaign here in wisconsin. and most of all, i want to thank all of you, especially all the students here at lawrence university. thanks for being here. yes! yes! now, you all seem pretty fired up and ready
partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provi
of anyone. i have many years and seven years as an educators and taught there and president of board of ethics and board of appeals and 25 years of experience in doing service to the neighborhood. i am supported by the incumbent and scott wiener and others and i want very bad to be your supervisor and i am asking for your support and there's give me your vote on november 6. thank you. >> hi. i am joel io and i am running for supervisor and they have a way of looking at the happy meals but can't fill pot holes. where is the common sense? and many paid twice to fill the pot holes and where is the accountability of our money? so if you're tired of your house being the city's atm, if you're tired of the same politics and same choices i offer you an independent choice. i promise to be your advocate and work for you and not for the special interests and the super pacs that pass the other candidates and it's important in the junk mail and look at the fine print and see who is really spending on who and who is beholden to who. i worked as a journalist for years and i will bring that c
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